BARTHOLOMEW MAKO (1890-1970)

"Symphony in Blue"

"Symphony in Blue"

24" x 30", Oil on Canvas 20263

"La Canada Foothills"

"La Canada Foothills"

16" x 20", Oil on Canvas 20257

"Palm Springs, 1968"

"Palm Springs, 1968"

10"x 14", Oil on Canvas 20246

"Planning the Future"

"Planning the Future"

18" x 22", Oil on Canvas 20304

"Home at Last"

"Home at Last"

10" x 14", Oil on Board 20255

"Tea Time"

"Tea Time"

14" x 21", Oil on Board 20094

"More than a Dozen"

"More than a Dozen"

30" x 24", Oil on Canvas 20259

"Sangria"

"Sangria"

18" x 22", Oil on Canvas 20258

"Desert Bloom"

"Desert Bloom"

12" x 16", Oil on Canvas, C.1969 20245

"Sierra in Blue"

"Sierra in Blue"

20" x 24" Oil on Canvas 20080

"Seal Beach c. 1930"

"Seal Beach c. 1930"

9 1/8" x 13 3/4", Watercolor on Paper 20091

"Saw Mill"

"Saw Mill"

6" x 20", Oil On Canvas 20256

"Saugus"

"Saugus"

13" X 19", Oil on Canvas, C.1926 10981

"Stagecoach"

"Stagecoach"

22" x 32" Oil on Canvas 20100

BARTHOLOMEW (Bartolo, Bartolomeo) MAKO (1890-1970)

 

Born in Budapest, Hungary on June 19th, 1890- Bartholomew Mako was one of the most prolific artists that you’ve likely never heard of. His works are scattered around Los Angeles, in a wide array of mediums- he painted, sculpted, drew, used watercolors, created murals, and more.

While in Budapest, Mako studied at the Budapest Academy of Fine Arts, now called the Hungarian University of Fine Arts. He graduated in 1914, and immediately went to fight in the war. During that time his wife Georgina Elizabeth Farkas Mako gave birth to their only son, who they named Constantine Eugene or “Gene” Mako. After the war, the small family moved to Italy first, then Buenos Aires, and finally landed in Los Angeles.

When he came to the United States in 1923, he began his career as a freelance artist. Then in the 1930’s became one of the artists employed by the Federal Art Project. This was a big step for Mako, because it brought him a variety of projects spread around Los Angeles. During this time he worked on a statue at Ventura High School, a bas-relief at Hollywood High School, a mural on the Pasadena YMCA, and a sculpture in the Burbank City Hall. 

His son Gene showed skill in tennis, and after attending Glendale High School went on to the University of Southern California with a scholarship to play on the team. He quit before graduation but ended up earning four Grand Slam doubles titles with Don Budge, and was inducted into the USC Athletic Hall of Fame.

Bartholomew Mako was extremely prolific, and worked on many public and private projects throughout his time in Los Angeles. He also had a strong connection with the Palm Springs area, and much of his work is inspired by the landscape around his home there. His son Gene was always influenced by his fathers work and ended up opening an art gallery in Los Angeles after retiring from professional tennis. He also wrote a book about Mako’s works called Bartholomew Mako: A Hungarian Master, 1890-1970. Bartholomew Mako passed away in his home in the Desert Hot Springs on January 3rd, 1970.

Biography adapted from multiple sources.

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